Category Archives: About Paul Davis

Are You a Wantrepreneur or an Entrepreneur?

Are you a wantrepreneur or an entrepreneur

Are You a Wantrepreneur or an Entrepreneur?

After having a tremendous breakthrough in my mindset about my business this month, I thought I should write a post to help people figure out the answer to the question: Are you a wantrepreneur or an entrepreneur? But, I just realized that literally everyone and their dog has written an article on entrepreneurs vs wantrepreneurs.

So, why do I want to write this article, still?

Because a story is worth telling. I write a lot of listicles, and I was going to make this a listicle, but since almost all of the above links are to listicles, I think that genre has been overdone for the question: Are you a wantrepreneur or entrepreneur?

My Entrepreneurial Journey

I have embodied what many of these lists call a wantrepreneur for many years. I look back now and embrace it with passion. Because for me, being a wantrepreneur means that I try, I work, and I learn. But, things don’t always go the way I want them.

You can read more about my personal journey with multiple businesses on my LinkedIn Profile. Long story, short, I have done 13 different businesses or freelance-type work in my adult years. Add to that my 8 different jobs I have held, and I am one busy fella.

For the purpose of this blog, my consulting, and your own sanity, I have a simple definition of a wantrepreneur. If you are working on a business but making less than you would earn picking rock in the fields of southern Idaho, you are a wantrepreneur. Working includes the time you spend thinking about starting a business because thinking is often the biggest hurdle in business-life.

If you just say you are an entrepreneur but don’t even think about starting a business, you are just a want. Sorry.

It was not until this last year that I moved from my definition of a wantrepreneur to an entrepreneur.

Wantrepreneur: You Earn Less Than Burger-Flipping High School Dropouts

I remember interviewing for a McDonald’s job a couple of years ago and they asked me if I could handle earning minimum wage and I laughed at them. After working for overseas content mills at $4 an hour, I would be happy to work for $7.25 an hour. Delighted, in fact.

Sadly, I didn’t get the job.

Entrepreneur: You Start to Figure Things Out

Now, I know that there are plenty of entrepreneurs who set the standard for entrepreneur as someone who builds and exits businesses. While I respect their vastly superior build-and-exit experience to my scratch-for-sustenance experience, I disagree with their definition.

To get a little nerdy, entrepreneur was coined by a French economist, Jean-Baptiste Say, in 1800 in response to an omission he saw in the classic The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith. In this definition, Say crafted together the word to mean one who undertakes. He used it to describe the type of business person who undertakes a venture, assumes an unknown amount of risk, and hopes for a profitable return. (Investopedia)

These three parts of an entrepreneur mean that, by my definition, a wantrepreneur is also an entrepreneur. They just have not reached a point where their ventures are able to sustain them.

If you are actually doing something towards your business, have taken some amount of risk, and are hoping and working towards a return on that risk, then you are an entrepreneur.

Even if the only capital risked is the time you put into creating it.

So, to answer the question, are you a wantrepreneur or an entrepreneur, the answer is three questions. Because all the best answers to questions are more questions.

Have you started a business venture?
Have you taken risk for an undetermined outcome or result? This means you are not creating gadgets or raising calves. Those are easily determined businesses (manufacturing and agriculture). Now, creating new gadgets for raising calves faster is an entrepreneurial venture, because of the added risk of creating something new.

Have you a hope of profit? If your entrepreneurial ventures keep bringing low to no profits, consider yourself a wantrepreneur. And keep trying. If your entrepreneurial ventures are bringing more than you can earn in an American entry level job, then congratulations! By my arbitrary, etymological, historical, and contentious definition, you are an entrepreneur!

Thanks for reading.

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Building Businesses Through Writing Content

If you have not seen Paul Davis Solutions active recently, the reason is simple: I have been writing content on multiple platforms for different customers. For example, FrameMaker Arts is a new site that Paul Davis Solutions manages content and website technology for:

Building FrameMaker Arts through content writing

Some other projects include helping with marketing planning for Greater St. Louis Parks, the creation of a website to help veterans get home loans (USA Veteran Loans), continuing to write content for Aletheia Christian College, and building a website for Pastor Randy Davis. These projects are incredible opportunities to continue growing my business as a marketing firm, and expanding my capabilities as a content marketer.

Places to Follow My Content Writing

While you can watch these different projects on their own basis, and I highly recommend it if you are interested in any of them, you can follow the lessons learned from building these and other projects here at The Writer’s Cue, at My Blogging Community, my free Facebook community, or by following Paul Davis Solutions on Facebook or Twitter.

Thanks, and Have a Happy Independence Day if you happen to be an American.

 

 

Goal Review: How We Define Success

I was asked this last week: “As a business owner, do you set and keep hours, or do you hustle all day, every day? ”

This question has often haunted me. In 2005, I sold books with Southwestern Advantage in Flint, MI. We started selling before nine a.m. and finished after nine p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and on Sunday we went to training and team meetings. It was an exhausting hustle, but exhilarating.

I didn’t make it through the summer.

Fast forward seven years to 2012. It’s summer again, and my new job requires travelling 7 months away from home.  I would have to leave my newborn son and my wife at our new house,  20 miles away from the nearest family.

I quit. I have not held a 9- 5 since.

Another five years down the road, I’m building a successful business and trying to keep these lessons in mind as I set goals and help others set goals for tree business.

Work is important. 

Family is more important. 

Rest and worship is more important still. 

Prioritizing goals is essential to great business building, and the highest priority goals should not be business.

Family,  spirituality, faith, worship, self-care, learning, and rest are some of the areas in our lives that should receive priority. This should be reflected in our schedules.

For example,  my schedule includes regular nights at home doing dinner and bedtime so my wife can study and dance. I try to avoid social media from Friday evening to Saturday evening so that I have uninterrupted family time and tune to pray and rest.

It would be much easier to commit solely to the business, but the harder goal is to be more than a successful businessperson.

So,  today I define success that I am sitting in a room, writing on my phone, keeping the scary things away for the two beautiful children playing in the photo above.

And now I publish this so I can play outside.

What non-business related goals are you crushing this week?

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4 Things This Content Marketer Loves That Average People Do Not

Are you an average reader/writer? The following list are areas that I think only a true aficionado of the written word will understand and get joy from.

This is me when I got my polo shirt from Blogmutt after selling more than 100 blog posts on their platform:

 

Me Happy to Be Writing

Do you think you have what it takes to be a constant content creator cultivating common communication with curious consumers? Also, alliterations are actually an art all alone. Consonance too.

  1. I love reading script written nearly 400 years ago and translating it into modern English. Like seriously love it. My wife was working on research for a Master’s Degree writing project and I kept on getting distracted from playing with my new Samsung Galaxy J7 because trying to read that handwriting is that fun! My sims were dying, but there were funky s’s, dropped words, and archaic phrases to discover.

So if you will stay up till 1 AM when you know your children will get you up before 7 just because you love your spouse, you are slightly above average. If you and your spouse both are glued to a handwritten document requesting “the courte” rethink their sentence of the death penalty because you love the ancient turn of phrase and the fact that “y” can mean so many different things, then you are a true logophile.

2. I love writing/reading fast. When I am really into a series of blogs or a good book, I shut my mind off and stop thinking about anything but the words and the meaning behind them until I am done. Hours will pass by without looking up from what I am reading or writing and I find it highly therapeutic.

Another weirdo in reading is my sister Rachel McCarron (Yes, I married a Rachel and I have a sister named Rachel, OK?). The first all-nighter she pulled off was as a mom of several kids when the last Harry Potter book came out: because a Bachelor’s Degree is nice and all but the real test of a reader is clearing over 700 pages while taking care of multiple children: all nighters are a must for the avid reader if there is no time in the day.

If you love to read a good book a month or less, you are average. If you write blogs at the exclusion of all other activities or put down your favorite book and go through culture shock because you thought you were actually there, you are a nerd like me!

3. I don’t believe the hype about online videos will last. GASP! There, I said what I always think when I read articles and blogs about how video is the end of the written word online.

They may be right.

But, I don’t care, because I am an old-timer: I like my words written. I may go the way of the dinosaur, but, by George, I will not go gentle into that good night!

Seriously, if you click through to a site that has only video and no transcript and bounce away for greener reading pastures, you may be a cultured creator of confabulation, like me! (And no, I did not know what that word meant before I discovered it today)

4. I like researching something I know nothing about. Case-in-point: my favorite rejection from a client at Blogmutt was when I tried writing a post to women (I’m not one), about thigh-highs (wait, what?) in the book 50 Shades of Grey (I think I saw that in a bookstore once. The only reason I took the article was because I wanted the challenge of trying to research something I knew next to nothing about for a target market who I do not identify as.

Here it is in all its glory:

Let’s try again. Please consider doing some research on plot summary of the book (even wikipedia is a good start). I think there are some fundamental parallels that we can be made about a young woman (debutante, almost) who gains self-empowerment through eroticism. Lingerie/thigh highs were often mentioned in the book. Let’s take it from there.

Wikipedia was a good place to start, but apparently not a good place to end, because that was my only practical source on the book. Needless to say, I have never attempted a women’s lingerie post since this, but I still challenge myself to learn more about my clients and there industries.

I worked through textbooks on logistics, shipping and warehouse management so I could write better blogs on it.

I read blogs, join Facebook groups, and sign up for email newsletters regarding Drones so I can write better for Go Unmanned. And I love it!

Do you love research? You are above average. Will you try to learn something completely outside your skill set for no other reason than it will give you something to research? You are a nerd like me.

So, how do you stack up? Are you average, above average, or a logophile, cultured word-nerd?

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Why You Should Write and Publish Content Outside Your Niche!

Wahoo! Today is controversy day in my 30-day challenge (Exactly 15 days behind, but who cares?).

While I love and understand the principles behind creating relevant content for a specific audience in mind, this post is about writing for yourself.

Content marketing needs to be focused, relevant, helpful, and targetted to specific questions and needs. Good content is shared, linked to, and talked about and increases user engagement on your website.

But, how do you find out what good content is? Analytics plus a big dose of experience are necessary for fine tuning your content creation.

I want to talk about experience; specifically, I want to talk about the experience we all need as writers to craft a conversational style, to practice writing our thoughts and viewpoint while getting valuable feedback from real audiences about what works, and what doesn’t work.

5 Types of Writing I Do That Will Not Generate Money

Woah!

A bit presumptuous, you think? All of these types of posts generate money for someone, but they are not my niche (business marketing materials), but I still write and publish them on various forums.

  1. Politics – I know, there are political commentators who make millions of dollars doing it (Michael Moore and Rush Limbaugh, to satisfy and enrage both the American Left and Right). But, I am not one of them and will likely never be one, because I get so bored with it. I practice writing about politics for multiple reasons though: sometimes I find something interesting, I get so tired of people’s ignorant comments, or I want a challenge.
  2. Poetry – I don’t often publish my poems, but sometimes I create something that I want to share with more people than my wife (who always laughs at my poor love poems I write her. Don’t worry, they are designed to make her laugh because they are poor poetry).
  3. Fiction – I have not written much fiction before, but I am starting a new sub-domain today about a group of people who incorporate Greco-Roman styles of fighting with local self-government during the Zombie Apocolypse. Why? Because I find the idea interesting (see my reason for politics above). I read fiction voraciously, which means I have and will continue to write it, even if it never makes me a penny.
  4. Spiritual Instructions – I love God, and I love others. I love teaching about loving God and others. I love being repetitive. Love, lovely, do…..
    OK. Enough of that. But seriously, I write about spiritual and religious topics because of my passion for them. I have not received direct payment from them, yet.
  5. Tributes – When someone dies, I mourn them through my writing, whether that is remembering my close friends and family on Memorial Day or remembering a teacher that I met once.

These are my 5 types of writing that I do because I love writing, what do you write just for the joy of it?

What To Write When Life Is Overwhelming

Writers often face the stress of creating content when life feels difficult. For a business marketing writer, this struggle is amplified by the realization that no writing equals no income. In the following post from 2016, I discuss how I write when life is overwhelming. 

I had a great weekend and an amazing Monday. I am increasing personal leads, practicing daily and weekly activities which will grow my business beyond any realistic hope I have had (I was tempted to say beyond my wildest dreams, but my wildest daydreams involve learning that I am the regal heir to a galactic empire who was sent to this backwater planet at birth… #getyourgeekon).

keep writing when life is overwhelming

Back to the point: I hit the inevitable moment when I realize that I am trying to grow too fast, do too much, and am missing out on quality services because of it. The post I had planned for today was a review of 15 different sites for finding content writing leads and gigs online. It will be a great resource, but it was WAY TOO MUCH for a post that is part of a one-a-day commitment.

So it is saved in drafts for a later time, and I am writing a post about the most important thing to do when you are building a business: the next thing.

For me, that is writing a post, even if it isn’t long, or flashy, or the most value-laden post I will ever write. When you commit to a daily activity for your business, do it. Make certain that your commitment has a limit (I am going to write one blog post a day for the next 30 days).

When you hit writers block, or business owner’s block, find out what the next little activity you can do is, and do it.

Today, that meant that I got up and went out to a tutoring meeting. Today, I wrote a post to encourage myself (and hopefully you) to do something meaningful and simple. Today, I am going to write at least one post on Blogmutt.com before I go home.

The solution for writer’s block, for overwhelming busy-ness and for fear is action. So, you should write when life is overwhelming, or podcast, or vlog. What doesn’t matter so much as just getting out of your shell and doing it.

So, I acted now, will you?

(edited April 2017)

Hello world!

Without any advertising on my part, my site has been found by 7 robots. And my mother in law.

Thus begins an epic first post.

Hello World, and Welcome to The Writer’s Cue!

I have been teaching, writing, and editing through online marketing for the past 3 years, part time, earning a whopping $12,000 in that time!

I know it’s not millions, but hey, we’ve all got to start somewhere, right?

This is a site for businesses looking for writers, and writers looking for businesses. This is a site where I will try to show you the wisdom I learn from the trenches of building online businesses and help you along the way.

I hope to provide valuable information and services for people looking to learn content marketing, to learn to build an online business from scratch, and to learn better writing. I also plan on providing writing and editing services, tips, and information for businesses who want to make better inbound campaigns, increase their content quality and quantity, and showcase their brand to the world.

Before we begin, here are some basics:

  • Nothing In My Life Is Apart From God – I am a Christian first, everything else last. And by Christian, I mean that I follow someone who gave up the ultimate success to become the greatest failure and servant of all. This will color everything I do and taking things to the Lord is one of my first steps for any decision-making process.
  • He Who Would Be The Greatest Among You Shall Be Your Servant – Zig Ziglar rephrased Jesus’ quote as “You can get anything you want in the world if you help enough people get what they want.” First and foremost, my business is about helping others.
  • The Laborer Deserves His Wages – The principle of keeping the fruit of your labor (intellectual, spiritual, physical labor) are essential parts to a functioning economy and to building a great business.
  • Thou Shalt Not Steal – Really deep stuff here. Stealing is bad. I think a great economy is one where people enter into voluntary agreements in exchange for labor and/or capital and as long as no stealing is involved, it is good.
  • Great Writing Is Creative – You thought I was going to use another scripture, didn’t you?
  • Great Writing Is Fun – Not all my writing is as informal as this, but that is because it serves a different purpose. The purpose behind the writing informs the style I use, but it is still fun.

That’s all on my introduction for now,

Come back later to see what else is new.