Grammar Rules You Still Have to Use in Modern English

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English Grammar Rules

Everyone has seen one of the “If you can read this” memes about how we can read so many different things, or the phonetic tropes like, “hukt on fonics.” But, how you use language, grammar and vocabulary matters. Especially if you are selling something, even if it is just a book.

That said, there are few rules that are universally applicable in what grammar or style of language you should use in marketing content, blogging, or even writing a book. Because every piece of written material has an author and an audience. Even if the author is just journaling for their own enjoyment or record keeping, this is still an audience.

Because there are educational forms of content, entertaining, inspiring, and more that combine with different dialects and cultural groups, take anything I am about to say with a grain of salt.

3 English Grammar Rules

  1. Don’t Use Taboo Words in the Wrong Place – While many sales people and coaches drop an F-bomb or describe the stinkin’ stench o’ sh…, understand that this might turn certain audiences off. And also understand that what is one person’s swear word is another person’s term of endearment. In most languages, a taboo word will either be around politics, bodily functions, religion, or a person’s identity. Use these words with caution.
  2. Understand The Determiner – If you learned grammar in classical schooling, they call this the article. But, we often don’t use article when we can use null determiner (See what I did there?). While your grammar check may tell you to always add the or an, sometimes dropping them and using what linguists call the null determiner makes a stronger point or makes the sentence stand out. (You might also think I just wrote a poor sentence, but whatever.) Other determiners include numbers, possessives, and words that come before a noun and determine its function and relationships.
  3. No, Abbreviations Are Not Great Marketing – Most hip marketing lingo does not age well. Current abbreviations will age just as well as a picture of a Motorola phone with a text following the abbreviations of the early 2000’s did in my old youth group room. Lol has been around a long time, and it might have crossed from the world of punctuated writing into real communication. But, brb, ttyl, roflmfao, op, ty, gg, and many other abbreviations will not create marketing that lasts and engages people. It might be catchy.

These are just some thoughts on grammar and English use. From my tired brain to yours.

~N Paul Davis

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