Tag Archives: writing tips

The Lead Leader Led the Leed: Humor and Writing

Yesterday I was talking with a colleague about the difference between my language, American English, and his language, Egyptian Arabic.

And the discussion came down to a simple fact of writing and language: humor is the highest sign of fluency in a culture.

The joke that is the title of this piece hinges on your understanding of the fact that English has many words from many languages and sometimes the spelling and pronunciation of the words don’t make much sense.

Humor and Writing

He followed up my witticism with one of his own: we have noses that run and feet that smell.

When you are going to communicate with people in writing, humor is a great way to make connections. But, you need to know who you are writing to in order to get that humor across.

Something one group of people will think is funny another group will not get at all.

In the modern global economy, you also have to realize that some humor is lost in translation.

But, everyone can enjoy the humor as long as you keep the following tips in mind:

  • Don’t hurt people with your humor
  • Don’t expect everyone to get it – After all, some come by slow freight.
  • Be an equal opportunity joker
  • Listen to your audience to improve your writing style

That’s it for now. And I’ll leave you with one of my favorite lost in translation jokes (Hint, the person who told me this was not a native English speaker, and I still don’t get it. But, my kids’ thought it was funny)

Why did the airplane crash?

Because the pilot was a loaf of bread.

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The Professional Writer

I have been covering the different mindsets necessary for successful activity, first on Paul Davis Solutions, then covering how marketing needs to be as an amateur on Pivotal Marketing Services.

Today, I want to talk about how to build a career through professional end results. No employee, customer or fan is interested in you if you look professional and produce amateur.

As a professional writer, what I look like doesn’t often matter. What you look like doesn’t matter. All that matters are the results: does your writing communicate to your audience and produce desired results?

For some writers, your content needs to convince someone to do something; you are copywriting. For others, your content needs to entertain someone for a period of several hours; congratulations, you are an author. For some, your content needs to educate, entertain, and nurture readers along a journey towards a decision point; you are doing content marketing.

The Professional Writer

In the professional mindset, you analyze your process and your results to look for improvement. This mindset, characterized by Booker T. Washington in Up From Slavery as a “Yankee” woman who “wanted everything kept clean about her, that she wanted things done promptly and systematically, and that at the bottom of everything she wanted absolute honesty and frankness. Nothing must be sloven or slipshod; every door, every fence, must be kept in repair. “

To approach your work as a professional, you need to understand fundamentals of grammar and voice, even if you choose not to use them. I have read many sales pieces with purposeful typos that get people to comment on the ad and introduce a conversation with the business owner.

A professional makes even their mistakes serve a purpose.

Having a professional mindset in writing means that you take time to understand your audience: their voice, their tone, their desired language style and reading medium.

Understanding Your Audience

When people first started writing blogs, they were written as web logs or journals. The first bloggers were mainly talking to themselves and people who identified with the blogger followed them. This is one way to find an audience. If you write to yourself, you will gather like-minded people around your writing.

For most professional writers, we are looking to speak to a specific audience. When you are writing to a specific group of people, you edit your writing, hone your voice, and research your audience (in the reverse order of what I just wrote).

Research Your Audience

If you are writing a fantasy novel, do you read fantasy novels? Have you been to a fantasy convention or even held your own book groups in your home town?

You don’t have to be a member of your audience before you start writing to them, but you will be a member of the audience by the time you have a professionally written product to give to the world.

I know more about IT security services and infrastructure now then I ever wanted to know, being rather laissez faire about the whole idea. But, I have written for many security clients, and to do it I have to think a little like my clients, and a little like their audience.

This is research: learning to think like the person you want to read your content.

Hone Your Voice

One thing I love about ghostwriting so much is it teaches me to change my voice depending on who I am writing for. From that practice, I am now creating 3 different website platforms with 3 unique voices for my 3 audiences. As a professional writer, you need to hone your voice by listening to your audience, practicing writing, and listening to them again.

Edit for Your Audience

Research plus practice means you will be able to edit your pieces to be ideal for your audience.

I need to make a clarification here: the professional mindset in editing only rarely seeks perfect grammatical and error-free writing.

Hop in any online networking group and you are going to see gems of writing like the following: “Did anybot got theirs reenabled and how?”

Surprisingly, it took me 5 minutes on my FB newsfeed to find that gem.

People speak differently to their parents than they do to their friends, your inner circle friends use words that your general peers do not.

This is how people communicate and build relationships. So as a professional writer, your job is to edit your written speech so that it communicates to a specific audience in a way that they relate to a message that you or your clients desire to say.

It’s a complicated job, but somebody’s got to do it. And trust me, there is no danger of automation truly taking away a writer’s job.

Quality Control

The final issue to talk about in the professional mindset is quality control. As a writer, we have to analyze our writing and hone it to be better, to speak clearer, to engage more.

The professional mindset is all about managing your time as efficiently as possible to provide the best quality you can for the value you are charging.

In the mindset of a professional writer, your quality control needs to be consistent and standardized. I will write more on some practical aspects of this later.

So, to have a professional mindset in writing that will advance your career, you need to research your audience, practice writing in the best way to communicate to them, and develop a quality control process to ensure your writing is doing what it needs to do.

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Can You Make A Career Out Of Non-Profit Writing?

Stick around the freelance writing community for long and you will meet people who need help with writing materials to run their non-profit organization. I always like to think of it that in the for-profit world, you have to pay your taxes, while in the non-profit world, you have to file your paperwork.

Because of the amount of paperwork non-profits are required to file, the opportunities for a writer are endless. Non-profits use paperwork for licensing, IRS approval, grant-writing, policy making, etc.

So, if you are going to build a business or a career writing for non-profits, what are some things you have to understand?

You Have to Talk About Money

This is the most important thing to consider about a non-profit writing career. Non-profits are often so focused on their vision and mission that budgets and emergency funds take a very low priority in day-to-day operations. Because they won’t think about their finances as much, you have to think about yours and be clear in setting boundaries.

Because of how easy it is to volunteer time at a non-profit, you could easily find yourself earning less than minimum wage, or nothing at all, while working full time.

Look at your budget needs, and don’t do a writing project that violates your budgetary boundaries. If you need to earn $10 an hour to make ends meet, don’t take a writing gig for less. You can still provide high quality writing at cheap, cheap prices like $10/hr. Then it is a win-win for you and the non-profit.

Occasionally, when a non-profit is in an area I want to learn more about or has impacted me in some way that I want to give back more, I will volunteer writing services fully. Volunteering is a choice, but realize that it hurts your ability to sell your writing services later, because you have developed a habit of not getting paid.

Understand The Non-Profit’s Mission

You love hunting, raising and butchering your own meat, and training sled dogs. It is difficult for you to write for the SPCA or the Humane Society. Even if it’s just legal paperwork, passion shows.

Since non-profits rarely pay the same amount as for-profit businesses, your passion needs to match with theirs or you will be miserable. There are plenty of charities that match the passions of you as an individual. Find them, join them.

Love Learning as Much as You Want a Career

Writing for a career is about learning as much as you can, and teaching others what you learn. If you are going to write for non-profits, this is especially true. Constantly learn and apply what you learn to the world around you. Then, use what you have learned and practiced in your writing. Whether you write marketing copy, grant applications, newsletters, tax documents or policies, this attitude will pave the way toward your success as a non-profit writer.

What have you learned about working as a non-profit writer? Leave me a comment below.

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It’s Only Day 5, It’s Not too Late for NaNoWriMo!

What is NaNoWriMo?

Short for National Novel Writing Month, NaNoWriMo is an organization that encourages people to write through some really great and fun challenges throughout the year.

Their biggest challenge is of course the challenge to write a novel in the month of November. Since they are not associated with any publishing organization and are funded mostly by donations, NaNoWriMo participants are encouraged to do more than just write novels.

You can set a challenge to write 50,000 words of any type of genre, including a content-marketing challenge to write that many words in one month.

For myself, this year, I intend to attempt a journalistic styled expose of my legacy, titled White Man from a Slave? But, since I am a content marketer and I have neither time nor creative energy to do all my normal writing and an additional 50,000 words on a novel, I am including blogging and other job-type writing in my word count, just because.

So, it is only November 5. You can still get a really good start at writing that novel you always wanted to, getting a really meaty blog going in one month, or writing your autobiography, because everyone needs at least one.

What Do You Want to Write This Month?

So, I am writing a autobiographical expose, and thousands of words in blogs. What are you going to write this month?

Head on over to nanowrimo.org/  to get started in the community and experience a great month writing this month!

Also, leave your comment below on what you are going to be writing this month.

 

ps. I just happened to move last week and was not able to get started quite yet. What’s your excuse?

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These Uses for Redirects Can Save You Time and Money

Redirects

3 Uses for 301 Redirects

I know, I couldn’t resist the numerical alliteration: 3 uses for 301 Redirects. Before we get into the uses, this post will cover some of the technical aspects you may or may not know about 301 redirects, 404 error messages, and why they matter on your website.

Technical Aspects of 301 Redirects

301 Redirects is a technical term for telling web browsers to go to a different page than the one you entered into a browser. The purpose of a redirect is to keep people from being frustrated by the error message you see so often in internet surfing: “Oops! The page you are looking for cannot be found!” This error message is technically called a 404 error message when a server receives a request for a page that it does not have. 301 Redirects Avoid a 404 Error

This is an error you do not want your users to see on your page.

“Generally, 404s don’t harm your site’s performance in search, but you can use them to help improve the user experience.”  – Google Webmaster Tools

Rather than sending the user this error message, a 301 message tells the browser to go from the intended address to another one of your choosing. Even though Google says, generally, it does not hurt search ranking, you do not want people to click on a search result and land on a 404 error message. This is the number one reason people use redirects: to prevent the website user from bouncing because they got an error message.

I have discovered several uses for redirects that do more than just prevent 404 error messages. Read on for more info.

Redirect Hacks

Redirect to A Social Page

One use of a redirect I have discovered, and use, is to send people from an easy web address to a hard to remember URL for a social platform. For example, I use www.mybloggingcommunity.com to send traffic to my free Facebook group. With a social platform, your address always comes after the name of the platform, so even if it only a word address (many profiles use long strings of numbers), it is better to have 3-4 words that identify your business and redirect that to your social platform.

Redirect from A Page You Haven’t Built

When I was writing the review for Hobo’s Grill in Fort Mill, SC, I thought I would probably want to build a landing page focusing on restaurants and breweries, but I did not have time to do it at that moment.

With a 301 redirect, I was able to insert my preferred link to the text of the article and set up a redirect to my homepage so that readers who click on it will still see something of value and when I build my local restaurants landing page, it will already have links to it.

Manage Inventory

I noticed this with an online store that I was helping manage: if you no longer hold a certain inventory item, people will land on broken pages when they look for it. If you are selling a product on your site, this is the last possible thing you want your users to see!

If you are going to discontinue an item in your inventory management, make sure you set up a 301 to send the users on to the replacement item. If you do not have a replacement item, then send users to a landing page explaining that you no longer hold that type of item, but recommend they look at a list of other sites. This way, you are providing your user with valuable service, rather than leaving them high and dry on your desolate 404 page.

These are some of the uses I have discovered for a 301 Redirect. What are some uses you have discovered?

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Don’t Make This SEO Mistake!

I Broke My Website with This Simple SEO Mistake

As I was researching my website content and its ranking on Google today, I came across one seo mistake of the many I have made and am learning from in managing my own websites. 

If you’ve ever heard of the barber who never had a good haircut because the other barber had to cut it,  that’s me. I am that proverbial barber, not because I have the other barber cut my hair, but because I am a creative person who always experiments on my own product first.

If I break my own website, I am the one who suffers, not my client. At least that’s how my thinking goes, some of the time.

So, after perusing one of the plethora of articles on what to do, or not do, to improve SEO, I removed the dates from all my posts in WordPress. It might  also have been during a theme update. I don’t remember, but the end result was I changed the format of how every post on my site looks. Without thinking too much about it, I moved on to other content projects for other clients.

Fast forward to today, when I was researching my target market and realized that I had 59 404 errors listed in my Google webmaster tools. 59 broken links that were not getting search engines, or more importantly, human eyes, onto my content. Google 404 Errors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you don’t think that 404 errors matter, just think about how many times you go to a website, get a “the page you are looking for is not here” and immediately x-out of that tab, never to return to the blog again?

I know I do it.

Simple SEO Principles

I wanted to take this time to point out to you the fact that you need to think about the consequences of your actions. The simple SEO mistake I made was to substantially change all the links on my site without setting up a redirect. Here is a blog on how to do that, if you didn’t know.

If you are going to change how your site is laid out, realize that it will break things like internal links, external links, and more, and you will need to plan on having Google crawl your site and giving you a list of pages to fix.

But the simple SEO mistake you should not do is to think that the search engines don’t matter. They do matter, they just don’t matter more than the people you want to read your website. But, if your website has poor SEO or other technical issues, at the end of the day, it is your users who suffer.

Think through the people who will be on your site and realize that good SEO practices make for a good experience for them, and also remember that your experiments on your website don’t just make you suffer, they make it difficult for anyone else to engage your website as well.

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How Do You Establish Yourself as a Thought Leader Through Content Marketing?

Other than blogging, I can’t think of any other ways to establish myself as an [industry]thought leader through content marketing. If you could give me some ideas on ways that I can really brand myself through my content that would be great. I think my biggest issue is not knowing where to begin. I know how to blog already but would like some other ideas that could really get my name out there to my particular market.

I’d love to help!

Thought Leader Through Content

They say content is king, but that is such a vague statement, what does it really mean? How are you, as a business owner, going to use content to establish yourself as someone others should take seriously?

To keep this as simple as possible, great business-focused content addresses a pain point in your customer’s lives.

Types of Content

thought leadership through content marketing

Still following the simple rule, there are three basic types of content you can produce online: visual, audio, and audio/visual. Visual content includes blogs, white papers, infographics, pictures, and brochures. Audio includes podcasts, live audio streaming, and radio spots repurposed online. Audio/visual includes live videos, advertisements, longer documentary segments, how to videos and other vlog formats.

Which one of these content types will establish you as an industry leader? Eventually, all of them. If you are just starting out, then there are two questions to ask about the type of content you should use: what are you comfortable with? and what does your audience use?

The comfort question is easiest, but understanding your audience can be more difficult. It can help if you ask your customers where they find business related questions. If you currently do not have a large client list, ask yourself three questions:

  • When does my customer research their business? Some people may do podcasts in the car during a commute, other people watch videos in the evenings or on weekends, others read blogs during their workday. Do you know what your target market does?
  • Where does my target customer access information? For example, a small healthcare provider may be researching issues on the fly all day via their phone. For this type of researcher, short and focused written content may be all they have time to read before they have to move on to the next patient. On the other hand, a contractor may be busy with tools all day and take specific times during the week to do research and online networking. For these, video might be a good format as they have to set aside time to interact with content anyways.
  • How can I get that information in front of the target customers? While you need to have your own channel for information (website, social pages, etc), you also need to get your brand on industry leader’s channels as well.

Places to Post Your Content

There is a tremendous amount of platforms available for getting your content out there. The following is a very partial list of places you can work your content magic:

  • On-Site Blogging – Yes, you need a website to post your own slides, videos, blogs, articles, and more on. This gives you control over your lead funnels and eases the creation of evergreen content. See my slideshare, Why Aren’t Ya Blogging?, for more information on creating a blog.
  • Guest Blogging – A guest blog is where you find someone in your industry and pitch them a story that you can write (or have a ghostwriter like myself write for you). Jill Stanton of Screw the Nine to Five has a great blog on guest-posting and if you want a place to practice your pitches, head on over to MyBloggingCommunity.com, a free Facebook group and throw us a pitch. We’ll give you some pointers on how to improve it.
  • Answering Questions on Quora  – I have not used this one, yet. But, Torchlite (Yes, I did just link to a competitor) has a great blog on how to use Quora to establish thought leadership.
  • Guest Interviewing on Relevant Webinars – This follows much of the same principles behind guest blogging, but with a focus on audio content.
  • Podcasting – Rather than writing out your story or your how-to, you can tell it to your audience via a voice recorder and upload it to a variety of sites including ITunes, Spreaker, SoundCloud, or a platform of your choice.
  • Facebook Live – This one just started taking off, but it is currently all the rage in Facebook’s ever changing algorithm ( as of March 2017). If you want to get good engagement on Facebook and increase your organic reach, plan to spend some time in front of a video camera broadcasting live to Facebook. Informal totally goes here, so don’t worry too much about what it looks like as what you want to say to your target client.
  • YouTube Videos – You can create these as live shots, even go live, but YouTube is a great resource for creating a unique video that showcases who you are, and what your business is about.
  • Twitter Authority – Twitter favors fast-paced engagement with your audience. With integrated photo and video sharing, it is also a great place to engage with more artistic forms of communication.
  • LinkedIn Authority – For many B2B marketers, LinkedIn is a great tool for publishing your content. You can create the posts on LinkedIn’s platform and link out to your site or just share your posts with others.
  • Facebook Groups – Be very careful about how to share your content in Facebook Groups (My mentor Wendy Maynard has a great resource for finding groups that have share rules)

These are just some of the resources that a savvy business leader like yourself can use to establish industry leadership with your content.

Have you found any content marketing platforms that work better than others? Ones that don’t work?

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The Art of Marketing: Long Form Content vs Short Form Content

Content Marketing is like Dance

I love being married to this beautiful dancer (Follow her choreography at FRAME). She inspires so much of my marketing and content writing; I am spoiled.

Also, she’s beautiful, but sorry, where was I?

Long-Form Content vs Short-Form Content

I know many people discuss how long-form content is better. Long blogs get shared more, more traction, do better on search engines, and what not. On the other hand, I read a blog by Niel Patel the other day that showed some of the first page ranked sites for “content marketing” had around 500 words. It goes to show, the length of your content does not matter as much as your quality (that could be said about other things, too. Annyywaaayy, where was I?)

Creating Content. You need to have quality content if you want people to engage with it, respond to it, and share it. But, as my talented other half reminded me yesterday, long-form content takes a different attitude to create than short-form content.

She was talking about the difference between creating location-specific improv pieces and filming them, but it applies equally to blogging.

Creating Short-Form Content

Creating a short piece is relatively easy: you get inspiration, you define what you want, and you sit down and write it.

I can write a short article in under 15 minutes if I am in the zone, have a well-defined subject, and limit my points to 3.

Creating Long-Form Content

On the other hand, long-form content takes development of a creative habit. You must set aside space to create, space to warm up, space to just think, and space to do all of those at the same time.

My wife was speaking about the fact that some longer pieces she was working on this semester made her feel like she wasn’t getting as much done as when she was able to create small, short pieces every few weeks. But, then she reasoned through the fact that creating a longer piece requires more time, energy, and creative effort.

  • Developing an idea – Longer content has to have themes and development. You may be able to get away with a 15 point or more listicle once or twice, but if you want to develop really engaging long content, you have to think through your target market’s pain points and really explore them.
  • Crafting Edits –  Editing a short piece is easy: you look over it once for its flow and then you read it out loud (or in my case, you subvocalize it quickly). A longer marketing piece requires looking at it multiple times: does it come to a point, is the point well supported, are there enough breaks in the text, do the pictures and infographics argue the point on their own merits, does your individual voice come through, etc. Each of these questions could require a full edit, making your editing time increase dramatically.
  • Researching your point – I usually write a short, high-level blog with limited research. If it is a topic I am well-versed in, I won’t research it at all. On the other hand, if a long blog or whitepaper is going to be worth someone’s time to write or read, it requires original research.
  • Understanding your audience – A short article that misses its audience is a minor nuisance. A longer webpage or marketing brochure that misses its audience is evil. Don’t be evil. If you are going to write longer articles, take the time to understand who you are writing to.

These are just some of the issues you will face in creating a great long-form article, webpage, or landing page. If you want to get a complete checklist of what you need to create a long-form blog or article, please sign up for my weekly email coaching tips below, and I will send one to you stat!

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7 Tips on How to Regularly Finish Your Business Blog

During my workshop, “Why Aren’t Ya Blogging?” one of the more common issues that small business owners face in crafting a quality business blog is the fact that they are so dang hard to finish. We business owners are a flighty lot: we have to balance sales calls, serving our customers, crafting content on our site, strategic planning, accounting, technology sourcing, artistic creation and strategic direction. Among other things. That is why I am sharing these tips on how to finish your business blog, learned from finishing my over 700 published blogs.Finish Your Business Blog

Writing A Blog is Hard

I get it, but there are some great resources for figuring out how to effectively plan and write a blog so that it is finished and published.

  1. Use a Numbered List – Someone asked my about why I always talk about “7 reasons,” “4 tips,” and similar numbers of lists. There are two reasons: one is that your readers like knowing what they are getting beforehand. The second reason is that you only have to write a little bit on each point. Only have time for a short post? Give people 3 simple tips? Want to write a long-form article that people will bookmark and read later? Write a list of the 15 best apps for running a blog.
  2. Outline and Draft – If you have the number of points you want to make, outline the intro, points, and conclusion and then draft it.
  3. Don’t Push It – If you find yourself staring at a blogand quickly clicking away to Facebook or some other equally amazing procrastination tool, don’t keep pushing. Get up, go for a walk, shoot some hoops, or play some hockey. When you have had a moment to breathe, sit back down and use the next few tips and the checklist linked to below to hammer out your blog!
  4. Use Music or White Noise to Filter Out Distractions – I use the Spotify Web App, and when I really need to focus, I listen to one of the many Latino and Latina stations…. If you cannot listen to any forms of music, get a fan or a white noise app.
  5. Understand Your Learning Styles – People think and learn differently. If you have never taken some time to understand your learning styles, you might want to research that a little more if you struggle with writing a blog. Maybe you are a kinesthetic learner and you need to write your blogs from your phone while jogging down a road at sunset.
  6. You Talkin’ To Me? – Understand the buyer’s persona or avatar you are writing to and you will be able to plan your blog better. Know your audience is always a key part of any writing journey, and a blog is no different from every other form of content.
  7. Single Task – Once you know what you are writing about and have an outline in place, take some time where you will not read any other article or go to any other sites. If you need to, close all tabs and programs except for the one you have open.

Finally, I have prepared a checklist to help you finish your business blog every time!

Get “My Blogging Checklist”Now!

 

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4 Things This Content Marketer Loves That Average People Do Not

Are you an average reader/writer? The following list are areas that I think only a true aficionado of the written word will understand and get joy from.

This is me when I got my polo shirt from Blogmutt after selling more than 100 blog posts on their platform:

 

Me Happy to Be Writing

Do you think you have what it takes to be a constant content creator cultivating common communication with curious consumers? Also, alliterations are actually an art all alone. Consonance too.

  1. I love reading script written nearly 400 years ago and translating it into modern English. Like seriously love it. My wife was working on research for a Master’s Degree writing project and I kept on getting distracted from playing with my new Samsung Galaxy J7 because trying to read that handwriting is that fun! My sims were dying, but there were funky s’s, dropped words, and archaic phrases to discover.

So if you will stay up till 1 AM when you know your children will get you up before 7 just because you love your spouse, you are slightly above average. If you and your spouse both are glued to a handwritten document requesting “the courte” rethink their sentence of the death penalty because you love the ancient turn of phrase and the fact that “y” can mean so many different things, then you are a true logophile.

2. I love writing/reading fast. When I am really into a series of blogs or a good book, I shut my mind off and stop thinking about anything but the words and the meaning behind them until I am done. Hours will pass by without looking up from what I am reading or writing and I find it highly therapeutic.

Another weirdo in reading is my sister Rachel McCarron (Yes, I married a Rachel and I have a sister named Rachel, OK?). The first all-nighter she pulled off was as a mom of several kids when the last Harry Potter book came out: because a Bachelor’s Degree is nice and all but the real test of a reader is clearing over 700 pages while taking care of multiple children: all nighters are a must for the avid reader if there is no time in the day.

If you love to read a good book a month or less, you are average. If you write blogs at the exclusion of all other activities or put down your favorite book and go through culture shock because you thought you were actually there, you are a nerd like me!

3. I don’t believe the hype about online videos will last. GASP! There, I said what I always think when I read articles and blogs about how video is the end of the written word online.

They may be right.

But, I don’t care, because I am an old-timer: I like my words written. I may go the way of the dinosaur, but, by George, I will not go gentle into that good night!

Seriously, if you click through to a site that has only video and no transcript and bounce away for greener reading pastures, you may be a cultured creator of confabulation, like me! (And no, I did not know what that word meant before I discovered it today)

4. I like researching something I know nothing about. Case-in-point: my favorite rejection from a client at Blogmutt was when I tried writing a post to women (I’m not one), about thigh-highs (wait, what?) in the book 50 Shades of Grey (I think I saw that in a bookstore once. The only reason I took the article was because I wanted the challenge of trying to research something I knew next to nothing about for a target market who I do not identify as.

Here it is in all its glory:

Let’s try again. Please consider doing some research on plot summary of the book (even wikipedia is a good start). I think there are some fundamental parallels that we can be made about a young woman (debutante, almost) who gains self-empowerment through eroticism. Lingerie/thigh highs were often mentioned in the book. Let’s take it from there.

Wikipedia was a good place to start, but apparently not a good place to end, because that was my only practical source on the book. Needless to say, I have never attempted a women’s lingerie post since this, but I still challenge myself to learn more about my clients and there industries.

I worked through textbooks on logistics, shipping and warehouse management so I could write better blogs on it.

I read blogs, join Facebook groups, and sign up for email newsletters regarding Drones so I can write better for Go Unmanned. And I love it!

Do you love research? You are above average. Will you try to learn something completely outside your skill set for no other reason than it will give you something to research? You are a nerd like me.

So, how do you stack up? Are you average, above average, or a logophile, cultured word-nerd?

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